Saturday 31st October 1846

“Had the unpleasant job to discharge James Hollingsworth from his employment as screener through repeatedly absenting himself.  But he saw and promised the master better attendance in future upon which a reconciliation was effected and he was permited to resume his employment.

The front of Buckingham Palace presents a different appearance from the commencement of the month [?] being encircled with boarding which extends round the front rails as far distant as the semi-circular pathway. The palace is to be enlarged which from the continued cart loads of rubble taken away and the cart loads of bricks taken in appears that the alterations to be undertaken will be very extensive.

The exterior and interior of St James’s Church Piccadilly is now undergoing a thorough repair and beautifying the windows of which are nearly half fresh glazed, which suffered extensively from the effects of the late storm.  The foundation of the new Rectory house on the same site as the old one is just commenced.

The gallery or bridge in Richmond Mews, Richmond Buildings, back of our house which … Pianoforte maker to the premises opposite has been roofed over with glass.

The weather this month has shown appearance of the approaching winter with … fogs which last 10 days has been very prevalent.”

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Sunday 25th October 1846

“Chillblains getting very troublesome obliged to use onion and salt to them. Wore worsted stockings for first time this season. Went through the Temple and round the church and through the churchyard. Copied into scrapbook Latin inscriptions over door in Farrars Buildings as also one within the railings surrounding the church. Went inside and saw Knights Templars brass effigies. This I believe is the first time I was ever inside the Temple Church. From thence to St Mary Aldermanbury, Bow Lane. Rained very heavy all the way home, at times so violent that I was obliged to put up at different times. Beef sausages for dinner. A duel of an afternoon. Stopped at home translating Latin and taking to paper some particulars of Granny Shepard’s family from her own words, of which she tired and waxed wrath with me for bothering her so. — Had Ann up in evening as usual. — Afterwards took walk — with ditto — through the City by Fleet Street to St Paul’s churchyard and then returned home whence I arrived half past 9 o’clock. White puppy fell overboard in the canal and was drowned. Mr Richard Latham completes his 43rd year (a fellow clerk at Eccleston Wharf).”


[Editor’s note: No entries on 26 or 27 October]

Friday 23rd October 1846

“Bought black Dutch clock from the Doctor’s in Goodge Street and fixed it in room. The remains of Mr Ternan (who died see 17th instant) were deposited in the churchyard of Christ Church, Blackfriars, followed by his two brothers and a few private professional friends.”