Sunday 2nd August 1846

“Rose quarter past 5 o’clock, breakfasted and prepared for journey to Hampton Court. Started from home accompanied by Matthew Ward at 8 o’clock, ditto from Hungerford Pier half past nine. Weather seeming very unfavourably, raining hard with thunder, though it looked beautiful at first starting. It continued to pour down in torrents till just previous to our landing at Richmond, when it cleared off and turned into a beautiful afternoon. Landed at Richmond 20 minutes past 12 o’clock and walked through Twickenham and Teddington to Hampton Court. Had our dinner of bread and beef at public house fronting entrance of Palace and got inside Palace half past two. M Ward was agreeably entertained at the splendid paintings, tapestry etc, as I was myself. Afterwards walked about gardens and went inside the maze. Left Hampton Court at 5 o’clock and travelled through Bushey Park etc to Richmond and returned by same boat ‘Echo’ about half past seven. Landed at Hungerford at 10 o’clock and got home quarter past 10 o’clock, having spent a very pleasant day. The rain in morning having deterred many persons coming that had not started already; we had it quietly to ourselves, the company being thin. — The expenses of this were cheap for myself. Mattie cost me about 2s. — “

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Sunday 28th June 1846

“Rose at 5 o’clock and went to the Mechanics’ Bath, Little Queen Street, Lincoln’s Inn Fields, for first time this season and had a dip. Breakfasted and then went to Bow. Got there at quarter past 10 o’clock, took inscription off tablet in the church, stayed service time and dined at coffee shop in Bow. Left ditto quarter past 2 and strolled towards Poplar and Blackwall. Got too far off, walked side river towards home and took the steamboat from Poplar to Hungerford. Arrived home about quarter past 5 o’clock and had tea, and afterwards — Ann Fox came up, but I could do nothing with her having a plaster between her legs in consequence of the soreness there. — Uncle John Shepard much better this week, having attended his chapel morning and evening. Queen Victoria crowned eight years today – bells ringing merrily.”

Sunday 14th June 1846 

“Rose at half past 2 o’clock (moonlight) and went to locks at the end of Grosvenor Canal, opposite Battersea fields, and met there by appointment George Palmer, James Robinson and his son, whence we all proceeded in Mr George Lea’s boat ’Clara’ up the river to Chiswick, where we all landed, and after looking over the churchyard, especially Hogarth’s tomb, we launched (it was about 6 o’clock). We landed and had pot beer at public house in Chiswick, but though I took but little, it so disagreed with me, having an empty stomach, after nearing home I jumped from boat into the Thames, but could not swim across, the tide being against me. This was on the Middlesex side the river, a little beyond Putney Bridge. This is the first time I bathed in the Thames, heretofore always being in the Serpentine or Canal. Reached the White House, Pimlico at 8 o’clock, and arrived home half past 8. Went to St Magnus the Martyr near London Bridge. After service, whilst looking around, I was accosted by a man civilly to tell him the date of a stone in the church which he could not see, who was no other than old Thomas Williamson, a singular character living in New Road, St Pancras. We had little conversation and parted as we were going our different ways. After, walked to Greenwich Hospital and paid to see the Painted Hall and Chapel.  Returned home by railway from Greenwich owing to the new shoes which I wore for the first time drawing my feet into blisters. Wore also white stockings for first time. Got home about half past 8 o’clock. Poor old Granny Shepard completed her 75th year today, also her last tooth but one came out today.”


[Editor’s note: No entry on 15 June]

Wednesday 10th June 1846

“Took trip up and down the Grosvenor Canal in Mr George Lea’s boat. Very awkward with the sculls, being quite unused to them, and had like to got into mischief by nearly getting capsized by a large vessel, but I got out of the way and escaped the danger. Afterwards George Palmer, horsekeeper, took me all round the Basin. Discombe brought home new shoes, tied with strings, and of light make, being certainly the neatest pair of shoes that I ever had, having neither tips or nails. Price 10s.”


[Editor’s note: No entry on 11 June]