Monday 30th November 1846

“Had fire lit in my office for first time this season. Saw Peter Poland and Morris junior of Hanway Street this evening.

The weather throughout this month has been remarkably fine and mild (with but very little fog) until the two last days which has been remarkably severe, being quite a dry sharp frost. The commencement of this winter may be dated November 29th.

The Mint, that focus of crime and misery in the Borough of Southwark, it is expected will be shortly demolished. A new street is projected from Blackman Street to Southwark Bridge Road which involves the entire destruction of the above notorious place.

Workmen are engaged laying down the electric telegraph from the nine elms along the footway on the west side of Lambeth Place, Kennington. On Monday last its efficiency was tried nearly opposite Vernon Chapel when it was found in good working order, to that point – the wires are placed in hollow hemp … which are again secured in strong metal tubes which are sunk … .

From this month may be dated the running of omnibuses from P… and from Charing Cross to the Bank for 2d, which until lately was … them), they are now quite plentiful.”


[Editor’s note: No entry on 1 December]
[Editor’s note: The location of the Mint in Southwark is still commemorated by Mint Street off Marshalsea Road.]

Thursday 26th February 1846

“Had job to move the Grenadier Guards from the Barracks near Charing Cross to the Railway Terminus, Paddington, which occupied nearly eight hours. This job is most annoying as there is no remuneration made it.  We care not how seldom it comes.”

Wednesday 18th February 1846

“A general election for the Liberty of Westminster took place this day between General Evans and Captain Rous, whereby Evans was chosen member. State of the poll at the conclusion 4 o’clock was: ‘Evans’ 3703, ‘Rous’ 2938 (majority 765), whereby Evans was duly elected. One polling booth was erected in front of St Margaret’s Churchyard, Westminster, and another at Trafalgar Square facing Charing Cross. Self took the opportunity at dinner time of running down to the first mentioned booth, and just caught sight of Captain Rous riding on horseback, in front of the statue of George Canning, when, the mob behaving unruly, he galloped off through Storey’s Gate, St James’s Park and Birdcage Walk, where I lost sight of him, though I kept at his heels for some distance. After the business of the day, I went in front of St Giles’s Church which rang a fine peal, and from thence to the ‘Phoenix’ public house and had half pint of fourpenny ale, a house formerly kept by John Fox.”


[Editor’s note: This by-election was caused by Captain Rous (1795-1877) becoming a Lord of the Admiralty and having to put himself up for re-election.  His rival was General George de Lacy Evans (1787-1870), who had fought with Wellington in the Peninsular War and at Waterloo in 1815 (he later fought in the Crimea in 1854).]