Sunday 8th November 1846

“Started early for the church of St Mary Islington. Took down few inscriptions in churchyard and thence into the church.  Sat in free seats in middle of church. Pork sausages for dinner. Started at 2 o’clock for St Alban’s, Wood Street, and took down two inscriptions in the churchyard and then went into the church. Meant to take down some in the church, but the afternoon was so dark that I could not see. Stopped service time and then returned home to tea. — Had Ann up in my room as usual in the evening. — At home all the evening reading etc.”

Sunday 25th October 1846

“Chillblains getting very troublesome obliged to use onion and salt to them. Wore worsted stockings for first time this season. Went through the Temple and round the church and through the churchyard. Copied into scrapbook Latin inscriptions over door in Farrars Buildings as also one within the railings surrounding the church. Went inside and saw Knights Templars brass effigies. This I believe is the first time I was ever inside the Temple Church. From thence to St Mary Aldermanbury, Bow Lane. Rained very heavy all the way home, at times so violent that I was obliged to put up at different times. Beef sausages for dinner. A duel of an afternoon. Stopped at home translating Latin and taking to paper some particulars of Granny Shepard’s family from her own words, of which she tired and waxed wrath with me for bothering her so. — Had Ann up in evening as usual. — Afterwards took walk — with ditto — through the City by Fleet Street to St Paul’s churchyard and then returned home whence I arrived half past 9 o’clock. White puppy fell overboard in the canal and was drowned. Mr Richard Latham completes his 43rd year (a fellow clerk at Eccleston Wharf).”


[Editor’s note: No entries on 26 or 27 October]

Sunday 27th September 1846

Breakfasted and started quarter before 8 o’clock for Bromley in Kent, through Lewisham and that way. Arrived there half past 11 and looked about the town and afterwards the churchyard, and took down a few inscriptions most remarkable. Had dinner at the ‘Rose and Crown’, and sallied back to burial ground and fortunately met with the sexton, who let me in the church and very obligingly turned up some of the matting to show me the flat stone with the inscription on Dr Johnson’s wife, composed by himself (which sight I should have lost but for the civility of the sexton, a circumstance I should have much regretted). Met with an inhabitant of Bromley who showed me several things, viz the College for Clergyman’s Widows, which we went over, and the Bishop of Rochester’s Palace.  Left Bromley few minutes before 5 o’clock and arrived home half past eight. Met Mr Weaver near Bromley in a cart (from whom I learnt that Mr Bond will shortly leave his premises, the railway company requiring the ground for the enlargement of the terminus).”


[Editor’s note: No entry on 28 September]

Sunday 26th July 1846

“Rose at half past 5 o’clock, breakfasted, and proceeded for Richmond. — Met Ann in Dean Street waiting to see me. Accompanied me as far as Westminster Bridge where I parted with her. — At half past 7 o’clock through Lambeth, Battersea, Wandsworth, East Sheen to Richmond, where I arrived half past 11 o’clock. Made for church first place and took down a few inscriptions in church and churchyard. Met Miss Kershaw, governess to Miss Manodes, near her residence Vineyard Lodge, returning from chapel with her little flock. Saw not Miss M A N amongst the number. Ate my dinner at the ‘Artichoke’; afterwards walked to Richmond Hill and, after tramping about till half past 4, made for home different road – through Kew and over the bridge, along waterside to Chiswick (saw 20 minutes to 6 o’clock Hogarth’s tomb second time this season), Hammersmith, Fulham, Brompton, Knightsbridge – home where arrived as the clock was striking eight.  Out twelve and a half hours, walked about 30 miles. Granny not being home, I took a further walk meeting Ann, and walked another two, making 32 miles. Ann Thomas came to see Mother this evening and I spent quarter an hour with them.”

Sunday 12th July 1846

“Up at half past 5, prepared for long journey. Breakfasted at home and afterwards started half past 7 o’clock for Harrow, through Kilburn, Willesden, Neasden, Kingsbury to Harrow. Arrived at the church as the clock struck twelve; walked about churchyard taking down a few inscriptions from tombs until half past 1 o’clock, when I went into the church and was shown over every part of it by the door keeper or church manager (an elderly gent, a more civil and obliging man I never met with). He, seeing my taste for antiquities, humoured my fancy and was not sparing of trouble neither, a brief account which I will give. He first showed me the age of the doors and locks, the keys whereof were ponderous, with curious wards. Next the tomb of a brother and sister kneeling, painted alabaster, date 1609. Then the pews which were put up in the reign of James I, but some of the seats for poor folk were about as old as the church. The ceiling was carved wood with the twelve apostles with their faces sawed off in the time of Cromwell. Then some brasses on pavement, the oldest … of Edward III. Left Harrow at 3 o’clock and dined on bread and meat.  Arrived home by Harrow Road at 9 o’clock, walked in all … .”