Sunday 25th October 1846

“Chillblains getting very troublesome obliged to use onion and salt to them. Wore worsted stockings for first time this season. Went through the Temple and round the church and through the churchyard. Copied into scrapbook Latin inscriptions over door in Farrars Buildings as also one within the railings surrounding the church. Went inside and saw Knights Templars brass effigies. This I believe is the first time I was ever inside the Temple Church. From thence to St Mary Aldermanbury, Bow Lane. Rained very heavy all the way home, at times so violent that I was obliged to put up at different times. Beef sausages for dinner. A duel of an afternoon. Stopped at home translating Latin and taking to paper some particulars of Granny Shepard’s family from her own words, of which she tired and waxed wrath with me for bothering her so. — Had Ann up in evening as usual. — Afterwards took walk — with ditto — through the City by Fleet Street to St Paul’s churchyard and then returned home whence I arrived half past 9 o’clock. White puppy fell overboard in the canal and was drowned. Mr Richard Latham completes his 43rd year (a fellow clerk at Eccleston Wharf).”


[Editor’s note: No entries on 26 or 27 October]

Sunday 18th October 1846

“Very wet morning. Went to New Tottenham Court Chapel, Grafton Street, Tottenham Court Road in conseqence of the weather preventing me going to my regular church. The rain descended in such torrents that I was obliged to wear two coats and carry umbrella likewise, even then I returned home wet, it raining without ceasing. At home all the afternoon reading History Queen Anne etc. — After tea had Ann up as usual. Carried on the same game as heretofore. — Took walk in evening with Ann through Fleet Street etc returned home quarter past 9 o’clock.”


[Editor’s note: No entries on 19 or 20 October]

Thursday 18th June 1846

“A fancy bazaar held in the Royal Gardens of Chelsea Hospital in aid of the Hospital for Consumption and Diseases of the Chest. Many of the nobility there, tents and booths erected. Brought home new hat from Quick’s of Pimlico, price 10s 6d. Uncle John Shepard continues to get worse, unable to leave his bed.”


[Editor’s note: No entry on 19 June]

Tuesday 16th June 1846

“Ordered a new beaver hat to be made at Quick’s Hat Manufactory, Pimlico.  It is to be a broad-brimmed – height of crown seven and three eighths inches, brim two and five eighths inches.  The new carriage road in front of Chelsea Hospital opened for public traffic for the first time.”


[Editor’s note: No entry on 17 June]

Sunday 14th June 1846 

“Rose at half past 2 o’clock (moonlight) and went to locks at the end of Grosvenor Canal, opposite Battersea fields, and met there by appointment George Palmer, James Robinson and his son, whence we all proceeded in Mr George Lea’s boat ’Clara’ up the river to Chiswick, where we all landed, and after looking over the churchyard, especially Hogarth’s tomb, we launched (it was about 6 o’clock). We landed and had pot beer at public house in Chiswick, but though I took but little, it so disagreed with me, having an empty stomach, after nearing home I jumped from boat into the Thames, but could not swim across, the tide being against me. This was on the Middlesex side the river, a little beyond Putney Bridge. This is the first time I bathed in the Thames, heretofore always being in the Serpentine or Canal. Reached the White House, Pimlico at 8 o’clock, and arrived home half past 8. Went to St Magnus the Martyr near London Bridge. After service, whilst looking around, I was accosted by a man civilly to tell him the date of a stone in the church which he could not see, who was no other than old Thomas Williamson, a singular character living in New Road, St Pancras. We had little conversation and parted as we were going our different ways. After, walked to Greenwich Hospital and paid to see the Painted Hall and Chapel.  Returned home by railway from Greenwich owing to the new shoes which I wore for the first time drawing my feet into blisters. Wore also white stockings for first time. Got home about half past 8 o’clock. Poor old Granny Shepard completed her 75th year today, also her last tooth but one came out today.”


[Editor’s note: No entry on 15 June]

Wednesday 10th June 1846

“Took trip up and down the Grosvenor Canal in Mr George Lea’s boat. Very awkward with the sculls, being quite unused to them, and had like to got into mischief by nearly getting capsized by a large vessel, but I got out of the way and escaped the danger. Afterwards George Palmer, horsekeeper, took me all round the Basin. Discombe brought home new shoes, tied with strings, and of light make, being certainly the neatest pair of shoes that I ever had, having neither tips or nails. Price 10s.”


[Editor’s note: No entry on 11 June]

Sunday 31st May 1846

“Rose at 6 o’clock and breakfasted. Afterwards went to Globe Coffee House, corner of Worship Street and Square, kept by a Mr Stacey, and read some news of the week. From thence to King’s Head Court Chapel to see Mrs Skirriker. Met her on Cumberland Street. She differed a little in dress since I last saw her by wearing a shawl instead of a cloak and a white bonnet instead of a black one. Waited half an hour after service to see her, but she did not come out, so I made best of my way homeward. Afternoon went with intention of going to Paddington Street Burial Ground, but could get no admittance, so went in Old Marylebone instead. Went home to tea and stopped the evening till 8 o’clock. — Had Ann up in own room, but there got to naughty tricks on the bed. — After which took walk with Ann round about Hyde Park and returned home by Piccadilly.  Had some cider and biscuits corner of Great Marlborough Street and Poland Street.

The weather this month has been very beautiful, especially the latter part, which has been a continuance of fine weather without any intermediate rain for the last three weeks.

Nearly all this month my mother has been confined to her bed with acute pains in the back, which, with a wound in her breast, renders her helpless, and at present there is no sign of her mending.

Coals sold at Eccleston Wharf: 1353 tons.”