Monday 7th December 1846

“A trial by jury took place this evening at office by Mr G Lea. The prisoner was young Gray, who was charged with having had the money for one and a half chaldrons coke which he had not delivered, but which he declared he had. He was cross-examined by Mr William Lee, who most strongly interrogated him, but without effect. I was but in as a witness, the lad Gray saying I gave him 3d beer money for shovelling the coke, which I have no recollection of. Appearances were so against him, and the father and son’s statements so contradictory, that it was settled the father should make good the coke.”


[Editor’s note: No entries on 8, 9 or 10 December]

Friday 13th November 1846

“Mr G Lea, accompanied by George Palmer, went to Kingston Fair to purchase a horse, which he did – a horse with only one eye, the other knocked out. Went round to Ann at Mrs Kennington. She has her head bound up in consequence of whilst breaking a coal, a piece thereof flew into her eye, causing her much pain and inconvenience, and of which at present all is not extracted.”


[Editor’s note: No entry on 14 November]

Saturday 7th November 1846

“Went to pay £10 into bank (Sir Claude Scott’s). Rode back to Wharf in the four-wheel chaise with Mr Lloyd, whom I met there – something uncommon, being the first time of riding in a vehicle of Mr G Lea’s. Had some baked mutton, potatoes and pudding when I got home – a very unusual dish with me, especially for the time of day – and afterwards pint tea at coffee shop, Compton Street, Soho. Office dial cleaned and repaired by Moginie, Brewer Street, Pimlico.”

Tuesday 3rd November 1846

“Old Mrs Lea from Barnet paid visit to her son George at the Wharf for to stop a while, I suppose. She gave me a shilling to give my mother for to assist her in her present illness and distressed circumstance.”

Saturday 12th September 1846

“Mr G Lea closed account with London and Westminster Bank and entered it in Sir Claude Scott’s, Cavendish Square. — But not of his own choice, the London and Westminster not thinking it worth their while, the balance in hand being so small. — “

Friday 11th September 1846

“Something extraordinary – sent to the London and Westminster Bank, Stratford Place, to pay in money. — To my surprise they refused taking it in. Sent message that Mr Mitchell, the proprietor, must see Mr Lea before he can take any more money in. Looks somewhat disgraceful [?]. — Took walk over Westminster Bridge — with Ann Fox — – it looketh quite a wreck with the loss of its balustrades and semi-octangular arches; being boarded in the carriage road is the present footway.”