Friday 27th November 1846

“All but out of coals at Wharf, having not one ton to spare in all the warehouses and craft being quite clear, which but for the good management of George Palmer, the weigher, would have been cleaned out in the early part of the afternoon. Since the Wharf has been opened, we never before have been so near out of coals.”

Friday 13th November 1846

“Mr G Lea, accompanied by George Palmer, went to Kingston Fair to purchase a horse, which he did – a horse with only one eye, the other knocked out. Went round to Ann at Mrs Kennington. She has her head bound up in consequence of whilst breaking a coal, a piece thereof flew into her eye, causing her much pain and inconvenience, and of which at present all is not extracted.”


[Editor’s note: No entry on 14 November]

Sunday 14th June 1846 

“Rose at half past 2 o’clock (moonlight) and went to locks at the end of Grosvenor Canal, opposite Battersea fields, and met there by appointment George Palmer, James Robinson and his son, whence we all proceeded in Mr George Lea’s boat ’Clara’ up the river to Chiswick, where we all landed, and after looking over the churchyard, especially Hogarth’s tomb, we launched (it was about 6 o’clock). We landed and had pot beer at public house in Chiswick, but though I took but little, it so disagreed with me, having an empty stomach, after nearing home I jumped from boat into the Thames, but could not swim across, the tide being against me. This was on the Middlesex side the river, a little beyond Putney Bridge. This is the first time I bathed in the Thames, heretofore always being in the Serpentine or Canal. Reached the White House, Pimlico at 8 o’clock, and arrived home half past 8. Went to St Magnus the Martyr near London Bridge. After service, whilst looking around, I was accosted by a man civilly to tell him the date of a stone in the church which he could not see, who was no other than old Thomas Williamson, a singular character living in New Road, St Pancras. We had little conversation and parted as we were going our different ways. After, walked to Greenwich Hospital and paid to see the Painted Hall and Chapel.  Returned home by railway from Greenwich owing to the new shoes which I wore for the first time drawing my feet into blisters. Wore also white stockings for first time. Got home about half past 8 o’clock. Poor old Granny Shepard completed her 75th year today, also her last tooth but one came out today.”


[Editor’s note: No entry on 15 June]

Wednesday 10th June 1846

“Took trip up and down the Grosvenor Canal in Mr George Lea’s boat. Very awkward with the sculls, being quite unused to them, and had like to got into mischief by nearly getting capsized by a large vessel, but I got out of the way and escaped the danger. Afterwards George Palmer, horsekeeper, took me all round the Basin. Discombe brought home new shoes, tied with strings, and of light make, being certainly the neatest pair of shoes that I ever had, having neither tips or nails. Price 10s.”


[Editor’s note: No entry on 11 June]

Thursday 23rd April 1846

“Died at the stables, Eccleston Wharf, after a strong fit of the gripes, the black horse last bought from a countryman near Oxfordshire about five months back. It was taken very bad at Willesden, where we sent a load of coals. It died seemingly in great agony. George Palmer, weigher and horse keeper, absent from Wharf through illness accompanied by a swollen face.”


[Editor’s note: No entry on 24 April]

Sunday 18th January 1846

“Wore long gaiters, with drab breeches, for first time.  Went to the church of St Jude, Turks Row, Chelsea. Sat in pew opposite No 13 South Gallery, and about the centre of the church from east to west (a very plain church – economy seems to be the thing studied by the builders thereof). From thence made for St George’s Terrace, Chelsea Bridge, and dined with George Palmer and his wife, weigher and horsekeeper at Eccleston Wharf, and had a very nice dinner comprising roast pork, potatoes, greens, and plum pudding and gooseberry tart. Left at half past 2 o’clock for Soho Square, and proceeded from thence accompanied by Ann Fox to Paddington churchyard.  From thence to the Edgware Road through Kilburn to Hampstead. — Seated ourselves on a seat in one of … a breach of the peace.  Got a shade nearer to committing a capital offence. — Thence homeward through Hampstead Road … Town where Ann met a female acquaintance viz … place where she works ….”