Saturday 15th August 1846

“Ornamental blind with collier and whippers at work, and bell and plate fixed: ‘Coal Office: Ring the Bell’ – zinc plate and bronze handle. A shocking murder was perpetrated about quarter past 12 this morning by JV Smith, man cook at the Guildhall Coffee House, King Street, Cheapside, on the body of Susan Tolledy, the kitchen maid, by cutting her throat in a fit of passion.”

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Wednesday 29th July 1846

“Cut in brick of Wharf Clerk’s office the year the same was built, ‘AD1845’, very legible. Prince Albert was at Magnus’s Slate Works, Pimlico, this afternoon, but I knew it not till he was gone.

The weather the forepart of this month has been very dry and mild, but the latter week has been exceedingly warm and a rare time for the bugs.

Died lately Lord William Russell, GCB, an elder brother of the Premier, Lord John Russell, rather prematurely, being only two years older than Lord John. The deceased was second son of the late Duke of Bedford. Lord George William Russell has been usually called Lord William Russell since the death of his uncle, who was murdered by Courvoisier. His lordship was born in Harley Street, London, on the 8th of May 1790, and had therefore only just completed his 56th year. It is supposed that he died at Geneva whither he had gone for the benefit of his health.

There is a piece of vacant ground in Queen Street, Pimlico, opposite King Street, for building a church, school and pa…, foundation whereof is dug and the walls of the same … few feet. A board near states that its name is to be St Barnabas. A new street has also been made and named Church Street.”


[Editor’s note: No entries on 30 or 31 July]

Sunday 7th June 1846

“Rose early, breakfasted, and afterwards went to St Ann’s Coffee House, Oxford Street, opposite Bozier’s Court, and afterwards to Tottenham Court Chapel and sat alongside Ann.  Met George King and his mother there. After dinner took little walk about St Giles’s, Drury Lane and Covent Garden. Discovered for the first time a head and foot stone of a portion of the Bryceson’s family in St Paul Covent Garden Churchyard. — After tea had Ann up in my bedroom. After showing her my story of London, got at indecent practices. — Took walk with Ann in evening about the Strand and returned by Holborn. Had pint of 4d ale and biscuits at the Sun and Punchbowl, Holborn, nearly opposite King Street. Uncle John Shepard absent from his chapel this evening – this is a sign that his back is very painful.”

Sunday 1st March 1846

“Rose at 6 o’clock. Went to coffee shop, Broad Street, St Giles’s – read news of the week.  On my way thither met Jack Richardson in Oxford Street. After breakfast made for St Mark’s Church, Kennington Common. Though there early, yet so crowded I could get no admittance, so bent my steps to St Mary Newington and there stayed. Sat in free seat, west side of church and north end, close against pew 34. Afternoon, made a fool of by A F, after waiting about Soho for an hour returned homeward. Had visit from Mr Guest who did not stop long but took M Ward to his place of residence (King Street, Snow Hill). After tea took walk with A F through Camden Town etc. — Round Albert Road. Turned up road to the right leading to a wayside cottage through a private road leading through Hampstead. Overlooked by two policemen kissing. — Returned same way homeward and arrived thence a quarter before 10 o’clock.  Mother taken very bad with pains in the back, supposed to be rheumatism.”


[Editor’s note: No entry on 2 March]