Sunday 24th May 1846

“Rose between 6 and 7 and after putting room little straight and having breakfast, went to St Luke Middlesex. Went round to Shoreditch to see Mrs Skirriker, but was too late. Dinner cold beef and lettuce and salad. Took walk in afternoon alone to St Pancras Churchyard and there took down few epitaphs. Spent evening with Ann at her lodging in Stephen Street and accompanied her to Dorset Place, Dorset Square, on an errand. Had pint cider and biscuits in High Street, Marylebone, and returned home. Queen Victoria completes her 27th year this day. Thomas Paver, Wright’s carman, also completes his 27th year today being born same day as the Queen, May 24th 1819.”

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Saturday 11th April 1846

“William Filkins, carman at Eccleston Wharf, oversleeping himself and lying in bed after 7 o’clock when he ought to been in Marylebone shooting coals, was fetched by the coalheavers in a wheelbarrow tied down and wheeled to Wharf accompanied by the wharfingers, who with dung forks and lanterns formed his bodyguard, the whole presenting a singular scene, and for which procession he had to pay one gallon beer. James Robinson reinstated in his situation as lighterman on promise of better behaviour.”

Tuesday 31st March 1846

“The White Hart Inn situate in Whitechapel near Somerset Street was sold by auction for the purpose of being pulled down and having some extensive building erected on its site. This inn is recorded to have existed before the reign of Henry VIII. It was condemned 40 years ago on the occasion of the first floor having given way by the weight of the coffin in which the corpse of the landlady. There were many remains of antiquity.

The oldest house in Marylebone parish was this month pulled down to the ground.  It was an old fashioned white public house which went down steps and stood back from the street, the sign whereof was the ‘Rose of Normandy’, the back of which was formerly Marylebone Gardens.  The house is situate in High Street No 32 between Bowling Street and Devonshire Street.

This month was concluded the war with India, which has been in agitation for some time between the British and Sikhs and in favour of the former.  After which an agreement has been entered into for them to pay £1,500,000 to defray the expenses of the British in four yearly instalments, until which the British hold their Government in their hands.

Coals sold at Eccleston Wharf this month: 1588 tons.

Weather colder this month than any previous … though remarkably mild … .”


[Editor’s note:  The battles between the British and the Sikhs took place on 18-22 December 1845.  Nathaniel had first referred to them on January 28th.
No entry on 1 April]

Sunday 29th March 1846

“Morning, rose about a quarter before 7 o’clock, went to coffee shop in Compton Street, St Giles’s. After breakfast went to King’s Head Court Chapel, Shoreditch, saw poor old Mrs Skirricker again, and after service followed her homeward down Cumberland Sreet, Worship Street and Providence Row into Finsbury Square where the old lady took the omnibus which I followed greatest part of the way along City Road, and then struck an angle through Islington across the New River, and came through the church yard and proceeded to her residence and there waited her arrival which presently followed. Hastened homeward to dinner, after which stopped the afternoon at home and had tea with poor old Granny Shepard. Afterwards saw ditto safely to Soho Chapel, then took walk by self up Tottenham Court Road, New Road towards Marylebone. Met Charles Freeman opposite Trinity Church with a young woman. Saw the ruins of the late fire in Crawford Street which destroyed four lives, viz a man and his three children. Proceeded onward down Edgware Road to Hyde Park, thence down Oxford Street to Soho Chapel and waited while the Chapel was over and escorted old Granny Shepard thence homeward (she has changed her residence lately and now liveth in North Street near to John Street, Tottenham Court Road), thence returned homeward and so closed this day.”

Sunday 8th March 1846

“Rose early quarter past 6, went to coffee shop in Windmill Street, Tottenham Court Road to read weekly news. Went to church of St Olave Jewry in mistake, intending to go to St Lawrence – found it not out till seated in pew. Fine old church enough but rather dark.  Took walk alone (my companion feeling indisposed) through Marylebone, Lisson Grove, up Edgware Road leaving Kilburn to left to Hampstead over the Heath and homeward across the Fields, between the Hampstead and Highgate Roads, till I got to Taylor’s Alms Houses. A rather dirty tramp of it. Half pint beer and biscuits at public house, Hampstead Road. Made from thence to Gower Street Chapel and there saw poor Old Granny Shepard. — Gave her hint that I might shortly want to draw some money from the bank. — Thence to Tottenham Court Chapel, and took a little walk with Ann. One of the oldest houses in St Marylebone viz the ‘Rose of Normandy’ public house, 32 High Street, between Bowling Street and Devonshire Street, is now being pulled down to be rebuilt. It was a fine old house which stood back from the street and went down some stone steps, two stories high, the back whereof was formerly Marylebone Gardens. Adieu to relicks.”

The life of Nathaniel Bryceson, 1826-1911

Details of the life of Nathaniel Bryceson, wharf clerk of Soho and Pimlico, London
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A written version of this podcast is available: Life of Nathaniel Bryceson, 1826-1911