Wednesday 25th November 1846

“Had job for first time to change silver into gold (an unusual thing) at the ‘Monster’ Public House, St George’s Terrace – over wooden bridge, Pimlico – and the Grosvenor Arms, Lower Belgrave Place, Pimlico. Miss Isabella Emery of 24 Hanway Street died, being subjected to violent fits, of which she had 11 the Sunday previous – this was one of my former mistresses, whom I served in the years 1840-41 as errand boy.”

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Saturday 7th November 1846

“Went to pay £10 into bank (Sir Claude Scott’s). Rode back to Wharf in the four-wheel chaise with Mr Lloyd, whom I met there – something uncommon, being the first time of riding in a vehicle of Mr G Lea’s. Had some baked mutton, potatoes and pudding when I got home – a very unusual dish with me, especially for the time of day – and afterwards pint tea at coffee shop, Compton Street, Soho. Office dial cleaned and repaired by Moginie, Brewer Street, Pimlico.”

Thursday 5th November 1846

“Dame Granny Shepard paid a visit to Eccleston Wharf, Pimlico, to see old Mrs Lea. She stopped nearly the whole day from 11 o’clock till 8 o’clock and was by them treated very nobly. Came from thence home with me. I had tea at coffee shop, Compton Street, Soho, side of St Anne’s churchyard.”

Saturday 3rd October 1846

” — Ann Fox met me at midday in Pimlico near the Wharf with her small black clock. — Exchanged — Ann’s — small black, Dutch clock for one of the same colour but much larger and very old fashion at Mr Eves, broker, Little George Street, Chelsea for a florin and the small clock.”

Monday 31st August 1846

“The new bridge crossing the Grosvenor Basin, Pimlico, called Elizabeth Bridge is this month been cemented over to imitate stone similar to Eccleston Bridge.

The old bridge of Westminster has been long talked of being pulled down, but it seems now to be earnestly intended, as the roadway has been blocked up nearly all this month.  It is intended to build a new bridge near the old one, so we may expect to soon lose the sight of Westminster Bridge, about the oldest on the Thames, with its canopy towers with seats therein and old round lamps over and its old stone balustrades, which I dare say will not be seen in the new bridge.  The present bridge was finished November 10th 1750 and opened the 17th.

The weather this month has been beautiful and fine, dry and warm, but yet without the intense heat of the last month – it has been about the finest month this year.”


[Editor’s note: No entries on 1, 2 or 3 September]

Monday 10th August 1846

“Nursery maid at Wharf left her situation. Mother went to a doctor’s in Gower Place and was so fatigued and ill that she was obliged to be brought home in a cab and was expected to die on the road. Bought penknife – pearl handle and three blades – Victoria Road, Pimlico.”