Wednesday 14th October 1846

“Bought eight prints (portraits) at Printsellers, Princes Street, Soho, 8d. A destructive fire broke out about 5 o’clock this morning at the Red Lion Public House corner Wild Street, Lincolns Inn Fields, which entirely destroyed the stock in trade and furniture and must have burnt very fierce although … was hardly damaged. Went to see it in the evening.”


[Editor’s note: No entry on 15 October]

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Friday 17th July 1846

“Had bread and cheese dinner at the Coach and Horses, York Street, Westminster, first time, adjoining the ancient almshouses in that street dated 1577, from the tap room of which I had a capital view of the back premises and gardens where was some of the inmates walking, all old widows of the parish of St Margaret Westminster, the eldest of whom was 96 years of age. Purchased engraving ‘Death of General Wolfe’ by Woollett, framed and glazed, dated 1776, at the Half Moon, Holywell Street, Strand, for a florin.”


[Editor’s note: No entry on 18 July]

Monday 6th July 1846

“Grosvenor Canal, Pimlico, water let out for the mud to be taken away, which occurs annually. Evening, after business, some of the coalheavers with a net dragged the canal and caught fish of variety – a cold damp evening to be paddling about up to the armpits in mud and water. Purchased eight old prints this evening in Princes Street, opposite George Yard. Chief Justice Sir Connyngham Tyndale died at his temporary residence near Folkestone aged 70 years.”


[Editor’s note: The Chief Justice’s name was Sir Nicholas Conyngham Tindal]

 

Thursday 2nd April 1846

“The new church lately erected in Chester Square, Pimlico, and named St Michael’s was this day (Thursday) consecrated by the Bishop of London.

Purchased an old print in Westminster, ‘The Portrait of John Milton the Poet at the age of 21 years’ in dark frame glazed. Took pair of heavy boots to Discombe to be sewn, the sole half coming from the uppers. He has took a small shop in Goodge Street, near John Street.  Had tea at Butler’s Coffee Shop, Tottenham Court Road.”

Saturday 21st February 1846

“Wall at Eccleston Wharf, name etc washed out, and wrote afresh the name ‘LEAS’ written tremendous large, nearly six feet in height, and well done. It reads thus: ‘Lea’s Coal Wharf, the Trade supplied’, which originally ran thus: ‘Eccleston Wharf Lea & Co, Coal Merchants, from Regent’s Park Basin’. The present writing shows very conspicuously indeed from Eccleston Bridge, Pimlico. Purchased this evening an old print of William Hogarth in gilt frame at broker’s shop in Tothill Street, Westminster, date thereof 1795.  Took dose of physic this night.”

Thursday 5th February 1846

“A letter directed to Mr Lloyd, postage unpaid, when opened proved to be a Valentine, supposed to be meant for me by my name being mentioned twice, or more, and which I suspect was sent by the nursery maid at Eccleston Wharf. If so, I feel obliged to her for directing it to Mr Lloyd, thereby saving me 2d. Her motive for so doing I know not, but she reversed the picture by sending an old house maid with mop and broom, thereby taking herself off rather than me. Bought five curious old prints at Miscellanous Repository in Princes Street, Soho, the subjects of which are as follows: a view of Privy Garden Westminster; a view of the Savoy from the River Thames; a perspective view of the new buildings at the Horse Guards; a view of the Foundling Hospital; a view of the Royal Hospital at Greenwich.”