Saturday 28th November 1846

“Some person this afternoon threw a basket from Eccleston Bridge with a cat in it, but the cat made its escape by getting out of the basket and swimming across, whilst the coal heavers pushed a light barge off, and took possession of the basket, which was nearly new. Somewhere about this time died Mr Pharoah, landlord of public house north side Little Pulteney Street, and one door from Wardour Street, aged 22 years.”

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Wednesday 25th November 1846

“Had job for first time to change silver into gold (an unusual thing) at the ‘Monster’ Public House, St George’s Terrace – over wooden bridge, Pimlico – and the Grosvenor Arms, Lower Belgrave Place, Pimlico. Miss Isabella Emery of 24 Hanway Street died, being subjected to violent fits, of which she had 11 the Sunday previous – this was one of my former mistresses, whom I served in the years 1840-41 as errand boy.”

Wednesday 14th October 1846

“Bought eight prints (portraits) at Printsellers, Princes Street, Soho, 8d. A destructive fire broke out about 5 o’clock this morning at the Red Lion Public House corner Wild Street, Lincolns Inn Fields, which entirely destroyed the stock in trade and furniture and must have burnt very fierce although … was hardly damaged. Went to see it in the evening.”


[Editor’s note: No entry on 15 October]

Sunday 7th June 1846

“Rose early, breakfasted, and afterwards went to St Ann’s Coffee House, Oxford Street, opposite Bozier’s Court, and afterwards to Tottenham Court Chapel and sat alongside Ann.  Met George King and his mother there. After dinner took little walk about St Giles’s, Drury Lane and Covent Garden. Discovered for the first time a head and foot stone of a portion of the Bryceson’s family in St Paul Covent Garden Churchyard. — After tea had Ann up in my bedroom. After showing her my story of London, got at indecent practices. — Took walk with Ann in evening about the Strand and returned by Holborn. Had pint of 4d ale and biscuits at the Sun and Punchbowl, Holborn, nearly opposite King Street. Uncle John Shepard absent from his chapel this evening – this is a sign that his back is very painful.”

Sunday 8th March 1846

“Rose early quarter past 6, went to coffee shop in Windmill Street, Tottenham Court Road to read weekly news. Went to church of St Olave Jewry in mistake, intending to go to St Lawrence – found it not out till seated in pew. Fine old church enough but rather dark.  Took walk alone (my companion feeling indisposed) through Marylebone, Lisson Grove, up Edgware Road leaving Kilburn to left to Hampstead over the Heath and homeward across the Fields, between the Hampstead and Highgate Roads, till I got to Taylor’s Alms Houses. A rather dirty tramp of it. Half pint beer and biscuits at public house, Hampstead Road. Made from thence to Gower Street Chapel and there saw poor Old Granny Shepard. — Gave her hint that I might shortly want to draw some money from the bank. — Thence to Tottenham Court Chapel, and took a little walk with Ann. One of the oldest houses in St Marylebone viz the ‘Rose of Normandy’ public house, 32 High Street, between Bowling Street and Devonshire Street, is now being pulled down to be rebuilt. It was a fine old house which stood back from the street and went down some stone steps, two stories high, the back whereof was formerly Marylebone Gardens. Adieu to relicks.”

Sunday 22nd February 1846

“Rose early, 6 o’clock, owing to my physic working me. Went to coffee shop in Little Rupert Street, Soho, to read news of the week. Made for St Katherine’s Church, Regent’s Park, very early, arrived there at half past 10 o’clock. Doors not open, crowd of people waiting. Bishop of Hereford preached in aid of the funds for building the new hospital in Brompton, now building, for consumption and diseases of the chest. The Bishop delivered a rather able sermon: text Hebrews ch13, v16. After service a collection took place.  Church filled before 11 o’clock with people of the upper class. After dinner took afternoon walk accompanied by Ann. Wore half-mourning gown and new straw bonnet trimmed black, first time, in respect to the decease of the late Mrs Burns. Walked through Regent’s Park. Rain threatened, halted, held up again. Proceeded onwards over Primrose Hill and fields to Hampstead Church. Rain fell in torrents, rather wetted. Sat awhile in church; looked over some monuments and tablets. Proceeded homewards raining very heavy.  Ann got very wet, self fared better. — Got across the fields to a narrow lane with an archway over. Sheltered ourselves under arch. Got to wicked tricks. — Rain gave over, hastened home. Had pint beer and two biscuits at ‘St George’ public house in Hampstead Road.  Met old Dicky Andrews in Euston Square, right well looked he. Home and to bed etc.  Old Granny Shepard very poorly. Mr Liston, the celebrated comedian, died this day, in his 71st year, being born August 1775, and on Monday 30th (corrected to March 2nd) was buried at a quarter before 10 in the cemetery, Kensal Green.”


[Editor’s note:  Nathaniel added this note about the death of John Liston, the comic actor, some time after February 22nd, but Liston actually died on March 22nd and Nathaniel mentions the death again then. The burial took place on March 30th.]