Sunday 27th September 1846

Breakfasted and started quarter before 8 o’clock for Bromley in Kent, through Lewisham and that way. Arrived there half past 11 and looked about the town and afterwards the churchyard, and took down a few inscriptions most remarkable. Had dinner at the ‘Rose and Crown’, and sallied back to burial ground and fortunately met with the sexton, who let me in the church and very obligingly turned up some of the matting to show me the flat stone with the inscription on Dr Johnson’s wife, composed by himself (which sight I should have lost but for the civility of the sexton, a circumstance I should have much regretted). Met with an inhabitant of Bromley who showed me several things, viz the College for Clergyman’s Widows, which we went over, and the Bishop of Rochester’s Palace.  Left Bromley few minutes before 5 o’clock and arrived home half past eight. Met Mr Weaver near Bromley in a cart (from whom I learnt that Mr Bond will shortly leave his premises, the railway company requiring the ground for the enlargement of the terminus).”


[Editor’s note: No entry on 28 September]

Thursday 16th April 1846

“Dragonetti, celebrated double-bass player at the Opera, died at Leicester Square.  He was a Venetian by birth and was born 1761 or 1762 and was aged upwards 84 years.

This day was sold by auction the houses forming the east side of Whittlebury Street for the enlargement of London and Birmingham Railway terminus, the present terminus being inadequate to the immense traffic on the above line. The Company have also purchased the new houses in Birchmoor and Cardington Streets, likewise the ground between Upper Seymour Street and Hampstead Road. An attempt made on the French King’s life by Lecomte, a woodranger, and which he narrowly escaped.”

Thursday 26th February 1846

“Had job to move the Grenadier Guards from the Barracks near Charing Cross to the Railway Terminus, Paddington, which occupied nearly eight hours. This job is most annoying as there is no remuneration made it.  We care not how seldom it comes.”