Sunday 29th November 1846

“Went to the church of St Mary Newington Butts; arrived there at 10 o’clock, saw a young couple married. Looked round the church and read monuments and commenced taking off one (a Latin inscription), but was interrupted by the pew opener, who told me come another day as service was about to commence. Sat in free seats in middle of church, between pews 51 and 70.  Hastened home and dined on pork sausages. Afternoon started with Ann (she wore her new cloak for first time) for St Paul’s Cathedral, where we arrived at 3 o’clock. First looked round the monuments and then went in the choir and stayed the whole of service time (indeed had we been not disposed so to do, we must have stopped the whole time, for the vergers lock the gates and there you are prisoners – only this afternoon two females were taken ill in a fainting state, but no assistance could be rendered without, the verger having locked the gates and departed and went his way, so that there was pretty confusion – people rattling at the gates, but nobody came till half an hour afterwards, when by chance the gate was opened). Left at 5 o’clock, returned home. — After tea I had Ann up in my room as usual.  We had not been closeted more than a minute when there came such a rattling at the outer room door which continued for about 10 minutes till at last the door was opened and Mattie walked in and caught us in the inner room. But [he?] said he had come for his milk which we had taken in. [He?] nodded as to say he saw how matters stood, but however, although he spoilt our sport, he did not totally hinder us from getting into mischief, for I made a terrible mess over Ann’s new cloak and my own breeches. — Reading etc the rest of the evening.”

Sunday 1st November 1846

“Rose at 7 o’clock, breakfasted and went and took a turn in St Paul’s Cathedral, and from thence to St Mary-at-Hill. Returning home through Pancras Lane, I met a man who accosted me in a peculiar manner telling a distressing tale and prevailed in getting a penny out of me, I, by his manner, believing him to be true. After dinner went to meet Ann with the intent of going to St Paul’s, but, after waiting till it was too late, I proceeded alone to St Anne’s Soho, looked over the tablets and stopped while prayers. — Had Ann up in the evening. — Took walk — with Ann — over Westminster Bridge, and after the outside of the Abbey etc, returned home about half past 9 o’clock. Saw the 2d omnibuses running for the first time in Trafalgar Square north side.”

Sunday 11th October 1846

“Morning went first of all to St Paul’s Cathedral and took down in scrap book the inscription on the statue of John Howard, the celebrated prison visitor. From thence went to church of St Mary Aldermanbury. A prayer offered up for the suppression of the approaching famine or otherwise sarcity of food which at present threatens this country – also a sermon for the aid of the suffers by the late disastrous fire at St John’s Newfoundland. No collection was made today but it was given out that a visit would be paid to all the parishioners in the ensuing week. 200 houses are reported to have been destroyed by the devouring element, the inmates of which are houseless and the climate there very severe; destruction of property is computed at a million sterling. Wet afternoon stopped at home looking into Latin Dictionary, progressing but slowly. — Had Ann up in the evening. Got to our old tricks. I spent a little seed up her petticoat. Very narrow escape of being caught by Old Granny Shepard as they must have met on the staircase. — Practised a little Latin till quarter before 10 and went then to rest.”


[Editor’s note: No entries on 12 or 13  October]

Sunday 13th September 1846

“Bathed at Mechanics Bath, Queen Street. Morning went to the church of St Martin Outwich by the New Road and Shoreditch. A church has just been completed in Old Street Road. Went round to see if I should meet Mrs Skirriker, great grand-daughter of John Bunyan, but was unsuccessful. A new stone has been lately fixed against 103 Bishopsgate Street Without, corner of Spital Square, showing the City bounds A D 1846.  Afternoon took walk to St Paul’s Cathedral and took down in scrapbook the Latin inscription … of Doctor Samuel Johnson as also that of Sir Christopher Wren … — Got her drawers off at last, but to no purpose. — Took walk with M Ward in evening.”

Sunday 30th August 1846

Bathed in Serpentine in evening. Went to St Martin’s Ludgate. After service, while looking at the tablets, an old gentleman beckoned to me and said ‘This is not a time to be gaping about the church, we are going to receive the sacrament’. It is also worthy of remark that the sermon preached today at St Martin Ludgate was from the same text as that preached at St Martin’s-in-the-Fields last Sunday, viz Hebrews ch 13 v 8. After went to St Paul’s Cathedral, but was too late to see the choir, but, however, saw some of the monuments which were certainly very handsome, though forsooth modern. Through Gough Square and Johnson’s Court, Dr Johnson’s residence, twice today. — Had Ann up as usual in evening, afterwards — took walk through Westminster as far as the Broadway; returned home by quarter past 9 o’clock.”