Sunday 22nd November 1846

“Rose half past six, breakfasted and made for St Mary-le-Bow, Cheapside; in my way there copied into scrapbook inscriptions on stones against houses as near facsimile as possible, as also in church porch an hour previous to service commencing. On my way home by St Giles’s Church in the Fields, seeing a funeral about to commence, I walked in and stayed the service time. Richard Andrews, undertaker, about the oldest in the metropolis – a wonderful little man – at a rough guess I should reckon attended to their graves not less than 20,000 bodies. Liver … for dinner.  Started soon after two o’clock to follow the remains of Mr McAuliffe, coal and potato dealer, of 18 James Street … half past 2 o’clock.  Mutes … . The hearse and coach arrived with single horse each, Jack Harris and Harry Green, coachmen. I was told that a Mr Jukes was the undertaker, Hatchard of Crawford was furnisher of the funeral, and Nodes of Chapel Street furnished the carriages. The coffin was covered with black baize and finished with black nails and cherub head handles, with tin plate inscription with gloria and urn on the lid. The procession moved about quarter past three. Two cabs with the friends of the deceased in followed; arrived at the ground (St George Hanover Square, Tyburn Road) about three-quarters past 3 o’clock and was taken into the chapel and from thence to the grave, which was about 16 feet deep, at the further end of the ground from the chapel and a little to the left of ditto, directly at the foot of the headstone of George Frederick Leyde and about five feet from the headstone of James Gamer, in a south-easterly direction, with the head lying direct west. A neighbouring clock told four just as he was let down. He was followed by six mourners – the first his widow, and then an elderly gentleman ( I think his father) and mother, with three other females.  His two shopmen (William Wood and another) were also there.  I got home to tea about 5 o’clock. — After walking about impatiently waiting for — three-quarters — of an hour for Ann, I went to her lodgings in Stephen Street and was there about an hour. — After 8 o’clock at home reading history of Queen Anne etc.”


[Editor’s note: No entries on 23 or 24 November]

Sunday 24th May 1846

“Rose between 6 and 7 and after putting room little straight and having breakfast, went to St Luke Middlesex. Went round to Shoreditch to see Mrs Skirriker, but was too late. Dinner cold beef and lettuce and salad. Took walk in afternoon alone to St Pancras Churchyard and there took down few epitaphs. Spent evening with Ann at her lodging in Stephen Street and accompanied her to Dorset Place, Dorset Square, on an errand. Had pint cider and biscuits in High Street, Marylebone, and returned home. Queen Victoria completes her 27th year this day. Thomas Paver, Wright’s carman, also completes his 27th year today being born same day as the Queen, May 24th 1819.”

Sunday 26th April 1846

“Wet morning, went to Anchor Coffee House, Dean Street, and then to breakfast at home. After ditto went strolling about to find church and could not. Went in coffee shop, Snow Hill, and read news of the week. After dinner took walk through Seven Dials, where I bought a small oil painting on wood in plain gilt frame which I suppose to be Shakespeare. Had tea with Granny Shepard in Richmonds Buildings, afterwards went to 7 Chapel Street, Tottenham Court Road, to see the outside case to receive lead coffin which will contain the body of Mrs Ann Nodes, lately deceased, and which is of curious workmanship being one and a half inch oak, smoothed and polished with mouldings and plinth round the lid to fit, and four pairs of brass handles after the style of the Quakers. From thence went to see Ann at Mrs Kennington in Stephen Street. — There regaled ourselves a little unlawfully …. and kitchen. — Supped there – bread, cheese and ale, and returned home afterward.”

Sunday 15th February 1846

“Morning rose at 7 o’clock and went to coffee shop in Windmill Street, Tottenham Court Road, to read newspaper. After breakfast went to the church of St Katherine, Regent’s Park. The church was so full that I was obliged to sit along north side of organ.  After dinner took walk to Tottenham Court Chapel Burial Ground and sauntered about the south ground for upwards of an hour. Went home, tea, and afterwards escorted poor Old Granny Shepard to Gower Street Chapel. From thence returned and met Ann in Tottenham Court Road and took walk with ditto up Hampstead Road to Chalk Farm Fields etc. Returned home though Regent’s Park etc rather lame from wearing a stocking much too large some weeks back, which still affects left foot. Took refreshment at Pump, corner of Newman and Oxford Streets – gratis. Clara Lea, eldest daughter of George and Anna Matilda Lea, this day completes her second year. Two persons whom I knew well by name, though not by sight, were deposited in their last resting place this day. The one was a Mrs Burn, late of Stephen Street now of Tottenham Court Chapel Yard, south side, the other a Mr Suttell, late coal dealer of Bell Street, Edgware Road, now of Paddington Churchyard, Paddington Green. He was aged about 75 years.”

Saturday 7th February 1846

“Charles Dutton, screener at Eccleston Wharf, fell overboard. Slipped off the gunnell of the ‘Jim’ barge while hauling in another. Was ducked well over head and ears. — Wages commenced at 20s per week this night henceforth.  Received 20s this night to begin with.  All things going on well at present. — Mr Burn of Stephen Street died this morning aged 72 years less one day.”