Friday 11th December 1846

“Died this evening at his residence, the Foot Guards Suttling House, Whitehall, Mr Brice McGregor in the 65th year of his age, formerly of the 3rd Regiment of Foot Guards. He was a native of Argyleshire and entered at Glasgow into the 3rd Guards 1799. In 1821 he was discharged, receiving a handsome pension and appointed Keeper of the Foot Guards Suttling House. Afterwards appointed Yeoman of the … at St James’s, which place he held till his death. It is … he has left a … not less than £15,000 … liberal … many in … in … country and London. Snow has made its appearance for first time and continued to fall through the morning accompanied by a very sharp frost. The wife of William Filkins, carman, delivered of her first child since her marriage – a boy – about 11 o’clock am. Purchased an old edition of Herveys Meditation 1750 for 1s in Bozier Court, Tottenham Court Road.”


[Editor’s note: A suttling house provided food and drink to soldiers.]

Monday 30th November 1846

“Had fire lit in my office for first time this season. Saw Peter Poland and Morris junior of Hanway Street this evening.

The weather throughout this month has been remarkably fine and mild (with but very little fog) until the two last days which has been remarkably severe, being quite a dry sharp frost. The commencement of this winter may be dated November 29th.

The Mint, that focus of crime and misery in the Borough of Southwark, it is expected will be shortly demolished. A new street is projected from Blackman Street to Southwark Bridge Road which involves the entire destruction of the above notorious place.

Workmen are engaged laying down the electric telegraph from the nine elms along the footway on the west side of Lambeth Place, Kennington. On Monday last its efficiency was tried nearly opposite Vernon Chapel when it was found in good working order, to that point – the wires are placed in hollow hemp … which are again secured in strong metal tubes which are sunk … .

From this month may be dated the running of omnibuses from P… and from Charing Cross to the Bank for 2d, which until lately was … them), they are now quite plentiful.”


[Editor’s note: No entry on 1 December]
[Editor’s note: The location of the Mint in Southwark is still commemorated by Mint Street off Marshalsea Road.]

Saturday 31st October 1846

“Had the unpleasant job to discharge James Hollingsworth from his employment as screener through repeatedly absenting himself.  But he saw and promised the master better attendance in future upon which a reconciliation was effected and he was permited to resume his employment.

The front of Buckingham Palace presents a different appearance from the commencement of the month [?] being encircled with boarding which extends round the front rails as far distant as the semi-circular pathway. The palace is to be enlarged which from the continued cart loads of rubble taken away and the cart loads of bricks taken in appears that the alterations to be undertaken will be very extensive.

The exterior and interior of St James’s Church Piccadilly is now undergoing a thorough repair and beautifying the windows of which are nearly half fresh glazed, which suffered extensively from the effects of the late storm.  The foundation of the new Rectory house on the same site as the old one is just commenced.

The gallery or bridge in Richmond Mews, Richmond Buildings, back of our house which … Pianoforte maker to the premises opposite has been roofed over with glass.

The weather this month has shown appearance of the approaching winter with … fogs which last 10 days has been very prevalent.”

Sunday 25th October 1846

“Chillblains getting very troublesome obliged to use onion and salt to them. Wore worsted stockings for first time this season. Went through the Temple and round the church and through the churchyard. Copied into scrapbook Latin inscriptions over door in Farrars Buildings as also one within the railings surrounding the church. Went inside and saw Knights Templars brass effigies. This I believe is the first time I was ever inside the Temple Church. From thence to St Mary Aldermanbury, Bow Lane. Rained very heavy all the way home, at times so violent that I was obliged to put up at different times. Beef sausages for dinner. A duel of an afternoon. Stopped at home translating Latin and taking to paper some particulars of Granny Shepard’s family from her own words, of which she tired and waxed wrath with me for bothering her so. — Had Ann up in evening as usual. — Afterwards took walk — with ditto — through the City by Fleet Street to St Paul’s churchyard and then returned home whence I arrived half past 9 o’clock. White puppy fell overboard in the canal and was drowned. Mr Richard Latham completes his 43rd year (a fellow clerk at Eccleston Wharf).”


[Editor’s note: No entries on 26 or 27 October]

Sunday 18th October 1846

“Very wet morning. Went to New Tottenham Court Chapel, Grafton Street, Tottenham Court Road in conseqence of the weather preventing me going to my regular church. The rain descended in such torrents that I was obliged to wear two coats and carry umbrella likewise, even then I returned home wet, it raining without ceasing. At home all the afternoon reading History Queen Anne etc. — After tea had Ann up as usual. Carried on the same game as heretofore. — Took walk in evening with Ann through Fleet Street etc returned home quarter past 9 o’clock.”


[Editor’s note: No entries on 19 or 20 October]

Wednesday 30th September 1846

The statue of the Duke of Wellington has arrived at its destination at the top of the Triumphal Arch opposite St George’s Hospital, Hyde Park Corner. I was there before 7 o’clock in the morning and had a fine view of the statue as it stood on the ground, and a splendid thing it is too. I went again at midday, but it was in the same place, only that it was turned round. I went again at night after business and it was then suspended nearly its full height, when I saw it drawn higher and finally wheeled on the arch, the apparatus moving with it. The scaffolding is a grand affair and has been above three months erecting.

The weather this month has been changeable, the former part to about the 20th intensely warm, like the middle of July, when it changed to almost winter. At present being so cold in the morning early that I am glad to wear gloves.

At the present time is being razed to the ground … old fabric the rectory of St James Piccadilly, corner of Church Place, which has stood about 160 years and was stated in the newspaper to have been one of Sir Christopher Wren’s architecture. It was built with red bricks and at the side had circular windows and in front sashes of immense thickness, the upper ones opening on hinges with diamond panes. The lower windows strongly … with iron bars; the cisterns were visible … Court, as also the water closet.”