Sunday 12th July 1846

“Up at half past 5, prepared for long journey. Breakfasted at home and afterwards started half past 7 o’clock for Harrow, through Kilburn, Willesden, Neasden, Kingsbury to Harrow. Arrived at the church as the clock struck twelve; walked about churchyard taking down a few inscriptions from tombs until half past 1 o’clock, when I went into the church and was shown over every part of it by the door keeper or church manager (an elderly gent, a more civil and obliging man I never met with). He, seeing my taste for antiquities, humoured my fancy and was not sparing of trouble neither, a brief account which I will give. He first showed me the age of the doors and locks, the keys whereof were ponderous, with curious wards. Next the tomb of a brother and sister kneeling, painted alabaster, date 1609. Then the pews which were put up in the reign of James I, but some of the seats for poor folk were about as old as the church. The ceiling was carved wood with the twelve apostles with their faces sawed off in the time of Cromwell. Then some brasses on pavement, the oldest … of Edward III. Left Harrow at 3 o’clock and dined on bread and meat.  Arrived home by Harrow Road at 9 o’clock, walked in all … .”

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Sunday 10th May 1846

“Rose 6 o’clock, went to Nockold’s Coffee Shop in High Street, St Giles’s. After breakfast went to St Luke, Chelsea New Church, heard sermon preached for the aid of the erection of the hospital now being built in Fulham Road for consumption and diseases of the chest by Mr Montgomery, Minister of Percy Chapel, Charlotte Street, a man of wonderful flow of speech, very learned, and nowadays of great note, so much so that an hour before the chapel doors open, people are seen to be waiting thereat to get a front seat. His text this morning was Proverbs ch 22, v 2, ‘The rich and poor meet together, the Lord is the maker of them all’. Had dinner of beef steaks owing to mother’s illness. After ditto went out with Ann, first to the Cemetery Kensal Green, thence to Willesden about the churchyard and cage. Had refreshment at the White Hart opposite the cage.  Returned homeward down the lane and through … . This day 50 years ago was Granny Shepard married at the church of St Andrew by the Wardrobe near Blackfriars.”


[Editor’s note: No entry on 11 May]

Thursday 23rd April 1846

“Died at the stables, Eccleston Wharf, after a strong fit of the gripes, the black horse last bought from a countryman near Oxfordshire about five months back. It was taken very bad at Willesden, where we sent a load of coals. It died seemingly in great agony. George Palmer, weigher and horse keeper, absent from Wharf through illness accompanied by a swollen face.”


[Editor’s note: No entry on 24 April]