Wednesday 29th July 1846

“Cut in brick of Wharf Clerk’s office the year the same was built, ‘AD1845’, very legible. Prince Albert was at Magnus’s Slate Works, Pimlico, this afternoon, but I knew it not till he was gone.

The weather the forepart of this month has been very dry and mild, but the latter week has been exceedingly warm and a rare time for the bugs.

Died lately Lord William Russell, GCB, an elder brother of the Premier, Lord John Russell, rather prematurely, being only two years older than Lord John. The deceased was second son of the late Duke of Bedford. Lord George William Russell has been usually called Lord William Russell since the death of his uncle, who was murdered by Courvoisier. His lordship was born in Harley Street, London, on the 8th of May 1790, and had therefore only just completed his 56th year. It is supposed that he died at Geneva whither he had gone for the benefit of his health.

There is a piece of vacant ground in Queen Street, Pimlico, opposite King Street, for building a church, school and pa…, foundation whereof is dug and the walls of the same … few feet. A board near states that its name is to be St Barnabas. A new street has also been made and named Church Street.”


[Editor’s note: No entries on 30 or 31 July]

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Sunday 26th July 1846

“Rose at half past 5 o’clock, breakfasted, and proceeded for Richmond. — Met Ann in Dean Street waiting to see me. Accompanied me as far as Westminster Bridge where I parted with her. — At half past 7 o’clock through Lambeth, Battersea, Wandsworth, East Sheen to Richmond, where I arrived half past 11 o’clock. Made for church first place and took down a few inscriptions in church and churchyard. Met Miss Kershaw, governess to Miss Manodes, near her residence Vineyard Lodge, returning from chapel with her little flock. Saw not Miss M A N amongst the number. Ate my dinner at the ‘Artichoke’; afterwards walked to Richmond Hill and, after tramping about till half past 4, made for home different road – through Kew and over the bridge, along waterside to Chiswick (saw 20 minutes to 6 o’clock Hogarth’s tomb second time this season), Hammersmith, Fulham, Brompton, Knightsbridge – home where arrived as the clock was striking eight.  Out twelve and a half hours, walked about 30 miles. Granny not being home, I took a further walk meeting Ann, and walked another two, making 32 miles. Ann Thomas came to see Mother this evening and I spent quarter an hour with them.”